The Morning After: Do you hear the music?

Jun. 29, 2011 | 5 Comments

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I came across this quote that is being credited to Angela Monet:

“Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music.”

The quote itself has been my motivation all week. Curious to find out about the author, I started Googling “Angela Monet” and found contradicting information. Some say she was an obscure poet, some rumor she was the lover of French impressionist Claude Monet, and others say she is nonexistent.

This got me thinking: The value of our words (and actions) can go beyond our own network, touching lives we never knew existed.

Last week I received an email from a researcher of the show Eat St., which airs in Canada on the Food Network and in the U.S. on the Cooking Channel (Oceanic Cable channel 322). A crew from the show was here to highlight a few of our food trucks in Hawaii and they were looking for writers to interview on-air and give some background on the local food scene. Somehow they found me, so I agreed to do the interview, focusing on Soul Patrol, the local soul food truck.

Chef Sean Priester stood tall and quiet in his truck, quickly assembling meals for each of the orders while keeping his composure as cameraman Shane Geddes took shots of the preparation. The long line, pressure from the camera, and the watchful crowd didn’t deter him.

One thing I like about Soul Patrol (besides the fried chicken) is that the collard greens, buttermilk, and fresh greens are all local. Just another example of how to incorporate sustainability with a non-local type of cuisine.

Director Keero Birla conducted the interview in which he asked, “What do you think about this new phenomenon with food trucks?” I had to admit it’s not new. These food trucks have been a part of our local culture since I can remember, and probably decades before I was born, when they were known as lunch wagons and manapua trucks. As a young child, I remember the distinct chime of the manapua truck coming down the streets of the Hawaiian homesteads in Waimanalo. The name “food truck” is just a new label for these mobile eateries. With the wide range of culinary selections, perhaps the variety of food trucks is larger but getting food from over the counter on wheels is no new experience for me.

Buddying up with the TV crew, they inquired about cool lounges, bars and places to check out in Honolulu, as they’d been focused on everything “food trucks” and were in some desperate need of cocktails. I agreed to take them to a few spots and show them the nightlife on their last night here.

  • http://profiles.google.com/joeltron Joel Mark

    What does the paper bag for the PBR other than just put more trash in Waimanalo gulch? Shipping a paperbag to hawaii in order to wrap a beer for 30 minutes in a “trendy” overpriced restaurant is the height of sustainability.

    • http://www.honolulupulse.com Lacy Matsumoto

      That’s a good point Joel. ¬†Thanks for sharing.

  • Anonymous

    Eh, how ’bout them Canucks?

  • http://twitter.com/brightviolet BrightViolet

    Angela Monet doesn’t exist. That quote is from Mme de Stael’s “Germany”, but often attributed to the imaginary Angela Money by those who are too lazy to do research and just pull something off the internet.

  • http://twitter.com/brightviolet BrightViolet

    Angela Monet doesn’t exist. That quote is from Mme de Stael’s “Germany”, but often attributed to the imaginary Angela Money by those who are too lazy to do research and just pull something off the internet.